MA — The Japanese Concept of Space and Time | by Kiyoshi Matsumoto | Medium

The Japanese concept of Ma is something that relates to all aspects of life. It has been described as a pause in time, an interval or emptiness in space. Ma is the fundamental time and space from which life needs to grow. Space for the Japanese psyche directly impacts the individual’s progress. These principles are universal, when applied effectively they enhance the way one thinks and how one engages with one’s surroundings. Japanese can visually identify with the meaning of Ma from its kanji symbol. Ma combines door 門 and sun 日. Together these two characters depict a door through the crevice of which the sunlight peeps in 間.

Source: MA — The Japanese Concept of Space and Time | by Kiyoshi Matsumoto | Medium

‘The Clock‘, Christian Marclay, 2010 | Tate

The Clock is a video projection constructed out of moments from cinema when time is expressed or when a character interacts with a clock, watch or simply a particular time of day. Following several years of rigorous research and production, Marclay excerpted thousands of these fragments from films and edited them so that they flow in real time. The Clock premiered at White Cube, Mason’s Yard, London in October 2010. The video lasts 24 hours and functions as a working timepiece in itself, synchronised to the local time zone. While The Clock examines how time, plot and duration are depicted in cinema, the viewer can also look at the work at any moment and use it to tell the time. Yet the audience watching The Clock experiences a vast range of narratives, settings and moods within the space of a few minutes, making time unravel in countless directions at once. Even while The Clock tells the time, it ruptures any sense of chronological coherence. Drawing on strategies of avant-garde film and music, but using recognisable motifs from popular culture, Marclay at once defamiliarises and heightens the temporal experience of the cinema, transposing it into the direct, lived experience of any viewer who engages with the work.

‘The Clock‘, Christian Marclay, 2010

Source: ‘The Clock‘, Christian Marclay, 2010 | Tate

Sarah Westphal – Outlets

 

In haar werk onderzoekt Sarah Westphal (1981, woont en werkt in Gent, België en Wermelskirchen, Duitsland) de relatie tussen personen, voorwerpen en hun omgeving. Centraal staat de vraag naar hoe eigenschappen van ruimte en architectuur bijdragen tot onze menselijke belevenis. Hoe worden we fysiek en psychisch beïnvloed door een locatie? Hoe nemen we de wereld rondom…

Source: Sarah Westphal – Outlets/Palimpsest (editie met boek) – Hausmannart

do it (2013-) – Exhibitions – Independent Curators International

“Curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, do it began in Paris in 1993 as a conversation between Obrist and the artists Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier. Obrist was concerned with how exhibition formats could be rendered more flexible and open-ended. This discussion led to the question of whether a show could take “scores,” or written instructions by artists, as a point of departure, each of which could be interpreted anew every time they were enacted. To test the idea, Obrist invited 12 artists to send instructions, which were then translated into 9 different languages and circulated internationally as a book.

Nearly 20 years later after the initial conversation took place, do it has been featured in at least 50 different locations worldwide, including Australia, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Mexico, Costa Rica, Slovenia and Uruguay. The driving force behind the exhibition is aptly summarized in the words of Marcel Duchamp, who states that “art is a game between all people of all periods.” He is only one of several predecessors to have shaped the modus operandi of this exhibition, which also draws from Conceptual and Minimalist art of the 1960s and 1970s as well as Fluxus practices. Each do it exhibition is uniquely site-specific because it engages the local community in a dialogue that responds to and adds a new set of instructions, while it remains global in the scope of its ever-expanding repertoire. This also means that the generative and accumulative aspects of do it’s ongoing presentation are less concerned with notions of the “reproduction” or materiality of the artworks than with revealing the nuances of human interpretation in its various permutations and iterations. In this way, do it is able to bridge the gaps between the temporalities of past, present and future.”

Source: do it (2013-) – Exhibitions – Independent Curators International